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It is going to be a long bicycle ride to Hue. The start from the guesthouse along the beach area to where the peninsula meets the mainland is very quiet and has very little traffic. As we cross one of the bridges leading back to the main land we watch fisherman bobbing up and down with the rhythm of the waves as they are fixing a buoy. We also spot a few boats that are tied up near the river's edge, waiting to go out for the catch of the day. It seems that blue is "the" color for boats. Not sure why -- maybe for camouflage -- but so far most of the fishing

Bicycle touring food differs in various locations.

One of the questions we frequently get asked is: what do we eat while we are on the road, how do we prepare our meals, and what makes for good bicycle touring food.

The answer can be a little tricky, because it varies depending on where we travel and whether we are going to stay at someone's house, at a campground, or whether we plan on wild camping. Also, it differs whether it is summer or winter time. Olive oil or butter become hard to use when it is freezing outside but our bodies still crave fatty things, especially when wild camping in the snow. We found "Schmalz" to be a great substitute because even in freezing conditions it is still spreadable. On the other hand, when it is hot and steamy, we'd rather have juicy fresh fruit and we end up eating an entire watermelon at once for lunch.

We definitely lucked out by staying at the little guesthouse by the beach. The ocean view from our window is fantastic and instead of listening to the customary concert of honking scooters and buses we can hear the ocean's waves crashing on shore and children...

It is impossible to get any sleep on the overnight train. So it goes without saying, that we are pretty beat and tired when we arrive in Da Nang  early in the morning. After picking up our bikes at the cargo hold, we strap all of our belongings back onto our steely steeds while it is starting to rain. As we are leaving the trainstation parking lot a cab driver asks us where we are headed to. Since we actually have no clue on how big the town actually is or where we could find somewhere to stay the night, we welcome his advice of where to find a back packer hostel somewhat close by. We quickly pedal through the rain to find it.
It's our third trip to the Nha Trang train station. The first time was two days ago to enquire about a train schedule to Da Nang. Supposedly, it is only possible to take the bikes on the night train to Da Nang, which is fine by us. Unfortunately, all the berths are already booked up for an entire month in advance, so we have to take the pull seats, which is fine, too-- we've slept in worse places before.
After some searching around, we finally find a hotel/guesthouse, away from " hotel street". Unlike the big booming tourist street a few blocks down, we are surrounded by locals who live and hang out here. Yet, it is still within walking distance to the beach. [caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="800"]bicycle sitting on the nha trang beach.jpg at the beach[/caption]
The weather is perfect for cycling when we leave Dalat: sunshine, but not scalding hot. Thanks to being up on the high plateau in the Central Highlands, we are safe from the tropical heat which usually rules in Southern Vietnam. [caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="800"]IMG_0587-2.jpg Farmers in the rice patties[/caption]
Although, we have quite a few sad moments and we have a lot on our mind while spending our days in Dalat, we still get out to see the town. After all a little distraction is good for us.
[caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="800"]P1100259.jpg Going for walk in Dalat[/caption] It's not glamorous being on the road for this long, neither is it all fun and games. Being on the road for this long, riding our bikes all day, searching for groceries, not knowing where we are going to sleep at night, setting up camp at night, cooking and tearing down camp again in the morning can get tiring. Getting dusty or muddy on the road and not having any shower or laundry facilities for days or weeks is anything but